All posts filed under: Expert Articles

Experts Argue Against Cry It Out

I personally don’t believe in the “cry it out” technique to get babies to sleep at night. If a baby is crying it’s because they want comforting. And as a mom, it’s my job to do that, even if it means I won’t sleep for a few years. I made it through with my daughter and she eventually started sleeping through the night when she turned three (I KNOW, I KNOW). I’m pulling all-nighters with our 9 month-old son and doctors are telling us it’s time to sleep train. My husband agrees because he, of course, wants to get a full night’s sleep. But I disagree. And so do these doctors.  Read this article published on BellyBelly.com, “Cry It Out – 6 Educated Professionals Who Advise Against It.”     Advertisements

Expert Advice: Fool-Proof Sleep Tips for Traveling with Kids this Holiday Season

    I’m happy to share the expert guest post below from Denise Stern, Founder of Let Mommy Sleep , just in time for the holiday season! Just last Thanksgiving, 48.7 million Americans traveled over 50 miles or more and we can expect much more of the same this year. For those traveling with a newborn, infant or toddler, we know how stressful travel can be, especially when it comes to nap schedules. However, for your peace of mind, Denise Stern, founder of Let Mommy Sleep, the country’s leading Baby Nurse and Postpartum Care service, is revealing a few fool-proof tips as you prepare your baby for travel during the holidays. Fool Proof Sleep Tips for Traveling this Holiday Season with a Newborn, Infant or Toddler, which includes: Practice at home! Many times babies are not used to sleeping in a travel bed or pack-n-play.Put baby in travel bed or pack-n-play for naptime at home in weeks leading up to the trip. Keep sleep routine as close to home as possible to help baby feel safe and secure.  If weather …

Expert Advice: 15 Doctor Recommended “To Do’s” to Fight the Flu

I’m happy to share this guest post from Dr. Christopher Calapai As we head into flu season there are many things we can do to “flu proof” ourselves. Regardless of whether you choose to get a flu vaccine or not, there are things we can do to heighten our chances of not getting sick this winter. Dr. Christopher Calapai, a New York based Osteopathic Physician board certified in family medicine, and anti-aging medicine provided us with a comprehensive list of 15 to do’s to fight the flu. Keep your surroundings clean, wipe surfaces at work, keep your cell phone clean. According to the CDC viruses can survive on a surface for up to 8 hours Wash your hands frequently and use a hand sanitizer. Remember the workplace and public spaces are a hotbed for germs. This is where the hand washing comes into play. Increase intake of vitamin D, C, E and A. Include foods such as red bell peppers (add to salads), sweet potatoes, chicken soup, salmon and garlic. Research shows that keeping vitamin D levels at 80 ng/ml or …

Expert Advice: Doctor’s Tips to Make Halloween Healthier for You and Your Children

I’m happy to share this expert guest column from Dr. Mayrene Hernandez. Halloween can be scary. Ghosts, ghouls and goblins abound, but the most frightening part of Halloween might be how many calories our children bring home in their trick-or-treat bags. The candy in an average trick-or-treat bag can contain as much as 7,000 calories* and all that candy can lead to tooth decay and a lot of extra pounds for the entire family. Dr. Mayrene Hernandez of UnitedHealthcare (www.uhc.com) has a few ideas so health-conscious parents can avoid ruining one of the most kid-friendly celebrations of the year? Instead of candy, opt for healthier or non-food alternatives. Candy is fun, but healthy food can be as well. Making small oranges, popcorn balls or fruit cups with pumpkin faces drawn on them can encourage healthier eating while still getting into the Halloween spirit. Give trick-or-treaters dried fruit, fruit leathers, crackers or trail mix. Trick or Toys? Or, if you want to avoid giving out candy or snack foods altogether, give small toys, stickers, temporary tattoos, pencils, Halloween erasers …

Expert Article: 6 Things about Getting Pregnant You Didn’t Know

Guest blog by ALYSSA DWECK, MD, OB/GYN at the Mount Kisco Medical Group in Westchester County, New York Starting a family and getting pregnant can be a serious undertaking for couples who are having a bit of trouble. TTC couples who take every precaution to baby-making may lack some simple yet very critical steps that can elevate pregnancy stress. ALYSSA DWECK, MD, OB/GYN at the Mount Kisco Medical Group in Westchester County, New York provides care to women of all ages and has delivered thousands of babies offers 6 tips to about getting pregnant TTC couple might not know. 1. You can’t get pregnant on just any day of the month. Teenagers might worry a lot less about pregnancy with a little out of the classroom SEXed regarding the menstrual cycle and fertility. Education about ovulation, peak fertility and “safe times” during the menstrual cycle whether it be from an phone app, a friend or a healthcare provider is key. This of course is not so easy if your cycles are irregular and doesn’t take the …

Expert Article: 10 Tips for Getting Pregnant

Guest post by Jean M. Twenge, Ph.D., author of “The Impatient Woman’s Guide to Getting Pregnant” For many women, getting pregnant can be a frustrating and anxiety-filled experience. That’s just how I felt, which is why I wrote “The Impatient Woman’s Guide to Getting Pregnant” offering tips for TTC women to feel more in control of their fertility. Try the following 10 tips: Obviously, it’s time to throw away your once beloved birth control!  A good rule of thumb is to get off of the pill three months before trying to conceive if you have been on it for less than a year, and six months prior if you have been on it for over a year. Make friends with your ovulation cycle.  Between a third and two-thirds of women under age 35 who are aware of their fertile time are able to conceive in their first month of trying. Find your fertile time by using a fertility monitor, ovulation predictor kits (OPKs), charting, or (my personal favorite) all three. Sometimes this can be trickier than it sounds – for …